Why should I hire a pest control specialist? I can just kill the bugs myself.

Pest Control in McClellanville, SC

Imagine this: You're sitting in your living room enjoying a nice evening with your family when your sweet tooth strikes, and you get up to go to the kitchen. You just purchased a brand-new pint of your favorite ice cream, and it's ready and waiting for you to dig in. You take it out of the freezer, open the lid, and look down at the cold, creamy treat in front of you. But before you splurge, you need a spoon to help. You can't be getting ice cream all over your fingers, after all.

You walk a couple of steps to the drawer, grab a spoon, and turn around with your mouth watering. Only now, it looks like something has beat you to the first bite. It's a giant cockroach, and it's sitting right on top of the fresh pint of ice cream you opened less than a minute ago. You can see its small, hairy legs digging into your delectable dessert - legs that have undoubtedly crawled over much worse things than the ice cream you bought.

Now, your ice cream is ruined, and you've got that creepy-crawly feeling that other roaches and bugs are living just under the surface of every counter and floorboard of your house. Unfortunately, that scenario could be very true - and depending on the pest, your family could be at risk.

For most Lowcountry residents, home is a sanctuary of comfort and privacy. It's a place where they can relax and spend quality time with their loved ones after a tiring day at work. However, pests like roaches and rodents are not mindful of boundaries and can invade your personal space at any moment. That fresh pint of ice cream you left on the counter? That's their meal for the evening.

They seek refuge and sustenance inside your dwelling, which is an appalling thought for most homeowners. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be your reality when you have pest control in McClellanville, SC from Low Country Pest Management.

Service Areas

A Critter-Free Home Starts with Low Country Pest Management

At Low Country Pest Management, we know how crucial it is for your home or business to be clean and pest-free. That's why we approach every pest control project with highly-trained technicians, effective control methods, and eco-friendly solutions.

In fact, we make it a point to provide all our customers with top-quality workmanship, reliability, and exceptional customer service, no matter how complex or simple the job may be. When you call Low Country Pest Management about a pest control problem, you can rest assured that it will be addressed safely, efficiently, and professionally.

Unlike some pest control companies in South Carolina, our expert technicians use the most advanced state-of-the-art tools and control strategies, complemented by decades of combined pest control experience. We specialize in many types of pest control and address a wide range of pests, including:

To truly serve our customers with effective pest control services, our tactics go beyond basic pest treatments by inspecting your home and making recommendations for pest-proofing your structure. By using targeted, eco-friendly pest control tactics based on Integrated Pest Management, we can prevent pests from entering your home in the first place. That way, you and your family can sleep well at night, knowing you don't have to worry about an infestation.

At Low Country Management, we address many types of pests, from termite control in McClellanville, SC, to rodent control and even crawlspace encapsulations for pests.

Lowcountry Pest Management McClellanville, SC
  • Rodents Rodents
  • Roaches Termites
  • Roaches Roaches
  • Crickets Crickets
  • Ants Ants
  • Centipedes Centipedes
  • Fleas Fleas
  • Earwigs Earwigs
  • Silverfish Silverfish
  • Spiders Spiders
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What Clients Say About Us

What are the Biggest Benefits of

Pest Control in McClellanville, SC?

At Low Country Pest Management, one of the most common questions we hear online is, "Why should I hire a pest control specialist? I can just kill the bugs myself." While this is true to a certain extent, truly effective pest control requires professional tools, strategies, and experience. Stomping a spider on your living room floor isn't going to control or prevent them from coming back.

Here are just a few reasons why homeowners and business owners should consider hiring a pest control company to remedy their problems.

Reduced Chance of Illness and Health Issues

Reduced Chance of Illness and Health Issues

Working with a pest control company like Low Country Pest Management can reduce and even eliminate many common health concerns relating to pests. Because the truth is many pests can transfer harmful bacteria and diseases via their droppings, bites, and more, causing allergic reactions and worse.

Professional Knowledge and Expertise

Professional Knowledge and Expertise

When it comes to pest control, it's best to leave it to the professionals. They have the knowledge and training to handle pests efficiently and effectively. With access to the latest tools and technology, you can trust that they will take care of any pest infestations in a safe and thorough manner. At Low Country Pest Management, we cater our pest control methods to your needs and your home or business for the most effective results. Contact our office today to learn more about our effective approach to pest control in McClellanville, SC.

Less Stress

Less Stress

When you're aware that you have a pest issue, it can be hard not to over-stress and overthink the situation. If you're losing sleep due to a fear of bed bugs, spiders, or other pests, professional pest control can help you stress less. Once your infestation is over, you can finally breathe again. To keep your stress levels low, our technicians don't just eliminate pests from your living space – they tell you how they did it and explain the steps you can take to avoid pests in the future.

Cost-Conscious Pest Control Solutions

Cost-Conscious Pest Control Solutions

Choosing a professional pest control service is a more budget-friendly option than attempting DIY methods. DIY solutions are often less effective and may not completely eradicate the issue. Professional pest control companies possess the necessary skills and equipment to ensure the task is accomplished correctly, ultimately saving you money in the future. Furthermore, they can complete the job quickly, removing pests promptly so that you can quickly resume your normal routine.

Avoid Costly Damage to Your Home

Avoid Costly Damage to Your Home

If not taken care of, pests can cause severe harm to your property. They can spoil food, ruin furniture and fixtures, and even harm the structural stability of your home or business. To avoid such damage and save money, you should consider hiring a professional pest control service.

At Low Country Pest Management, we provide peace of mind for our customers through our reliable, effective pest control services in South Carolina. Some of the most requested services we offer include rodent control, termite control, and crawlspace encapsulations.

 Just Kill The Bugs McClellanville, SC

At Low Country Pest Management, we provide peace of mind for our customers through our reliable, effective pest control services in South Carolina. Some of the most requested services we offer include rodent control, termite control, and crawlspace encapsulations.

phone (843) 810-7378

Is There a Rat Hiding in Your Home?

It's Time for Rodent Control in McClellanville, SC

Discovering a rat, mouse, squirrel, or other rodent in your home can be a distressing experience. These nasty creatures are known for their destructive behavior, chewing on wires, spreading bacteria, and leaving behind dangerous droppings.

Rodents are also known to breed and multiply quickly. While it may be tempting to take matters into your own hands and swat them away with a broom, seeking professional rodent control services is the safest and most effective way to protect your loved ones. Our skilled rodent control technicians are licensed and have the necessary expertise and equipment to provide long-term solutions for your family's safety.

Our effective rodent control strategies include sealing as many holes and cracks as possible on the outside of your home. Large holes or cracks in your foundation are filled with steel wool or wire mesh before sealing with caulk or foam to keep mice from chewing through. Our pest control techs then seal any openings into your attic space to prevent mice and other unwanted guests out.

Some of the most common rodents we keep out of your home include the following:

  • Rats
  • Mice
  • Opossums
  • Squirrels
  • Raccoons
  • More

Low Country Pest Management Pro Tip:

Great rodent control doesn't end when our technicians leave. To keep rodents as far away from your home as possible, remember to keep materials, such as firewood or stacks of lumber, away from the house to minimize hiding places. Debris and leaves should be removed from around the foundation of your home. Lastly, try to keep the inside of your home clean, tidy, and free of food items lying around.

Pest Control McClellanville, SC

Protect Your Home and Belongings with

Termite Control in McClellanville, SC

Termites can cause significant damage to your home's aesthetics and structural integrity, surpassing that of hurricanes and fires combined. With a single colony consisting of thousands or millions of members, termites have an endless supply of their favorite food: wood. As they relentlessly consume wood and other materials, extensive subterranean and dry wood damage can occur.

Unfortunately, in South Carolina, without professional termite control, it's not a matter of if termites will find your home but when. To make matters worse, most homeowner insurance policies do not cover termite damage, meaning it's imperative that you deal with termite infestations quickly and efficiently. If you suspect a termite infestation in your home, reach out to Low Country Pest Management ASAP for an inspection.

Our termite solutions include a bi-annual inspection (coming out to your house twice a year) instead of the standard one time per year, protecting your home from termites in South Carolina, including the destructive subterranean termite. Most other termite exterminators in South Carolina don't provide such comprehensive service.

 Rodent Control McClellanville, SC
 Termite Control McClellanville, SC

What Factors Contribute to Termites in Your Home?

In the Lowcountry and other areas of South Carolina, termites infest homes every day for various reasons. Different types of termites are attracted to wood, but each species has a specific preference for the type of wood they consume. Dampwood termites prefer damp wood, while drywood termites look for dry wood. On the other hand, subterranean termites require moist soil nearby and will devour any wood in contact with or close to the earth.

The following factors may lead to a termite infestation in your home:

  • Year-Round Humidity
  • Warm or Hot Weather
  • Moisture Due to Leaky Pipes, Bad Airflow, or Poor Drainage
  • Wood in Contact with Your Home, Like Mulch and Shrubs
  • Gaps in Your Home's Siding
  • Cracks or Fissures in the Foundation of Your Home

Tips for a Termite-Free Home

While professional termite control is always the best route to go for effective, long-term termite prevention, there are some steps you can take to help mitigate termites in your home.

phone (843) 810-7378
drainage

Correct Drainage Issues

To keep termites at bay, it's important to avoid excess moisture around your home. Termites thrive in damp conditions, so proper drainage around your house can help prevent an infestation. Check that your downspouts are directing water away from your home, and ensure that your A/C drip lines and faucets aren't causing water to pool around your foundation. Additionally, be sure to clean your gutters regularly to prevent any excess moisture buildup.

Move Mulch

Move Mulch

Most mulches are made of wood and are also damp or wet, creating the perfect environment for termites to thrive. Make sure you rake any mulch you have away from the foundation of your home to minimize termite infestations.

Keep Firewood Away

Keep Firewood Away

Much like mulch, firewood and other forms of wood like discarded branches can give termites easy access to your home when they're too close. Try to move firewood away from the foundation of your home much like you move mulch. For more tips on how you can mitigate a termite infestation in your home, contact Low Country Pest Management.

Crawlspace Pest Encapsulations:

Prevention from the Ground Up

To maintain an active infestation, household pests require three basic requirements: a food source, a harborage area for survival and reproduction, and moisture. Moisture problems within a property often lead to pest issues, making it necessary to include crawl space insect control in your home maintenance plan. Low Country Pest Management recognizes that eliminating excess moisture is crucial to safeguarding a property and its occupants from pests throughout the year.

That's why we often install crawlspace encapsulation for issues like rodent and termite control in McClellanville, SC.

 Pest Encapsulation McClellanville, SC
 McClellanville, SC

What is Crawlspace Encapsulation for Pest Control?

Encapsulation for pests is a tactic that includes covering the walls of your crawlspace with a heavy-duty vapor barrier material to help minimize moisture and, by proxy, keep pests at bay. This barrier is secured to your foundation's walls and ceiling piers. To further benefit an encapsulation for pest control, our team may use dehumidifiers, foundation fans, or foundation vents to further decrease moisture.

Signs You Need a Crawlspace Pest Encapsulation

Excessive moisture in and around a house can lead to the proliferation of household pests like rodents, spiders, house ants, carpenter ants, centipedes, earwigs, and crickets. If you notice any of the following signs, it may be time to consider crawl space insect control.

  • Smells of Must or Mold
  • Mildew on Your Floors or Ceilings
  • Soil in Crawlspace is Wet
  • Bricks or Masonry Around Home is Crumbling
  • Standing or Pooling Water Within or Near Foundation
  • Discoloration on Your Home’s Siding
  • Porch and Patio Water Stains
  • Spongy-Feeling Flooring

To learn more about pest encapsulation services from Low Country Pest Management, contact our office today. We would be happy to explain our process and hear more about the issues you're facing.

Lowcountry Pest Management McClellanville, SC

Trust the Best When

It's Time to Eliminate Pests

Whether you need rodent control in McClellanville, SC, or you're dealing with another form of pests such as termites, roaches, spiders, and more, Low Country Pest Management is here to help. Unlike some of our competition, our #1 goal is to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind. Our team of skilled pest control professionals implements environmentally-friendly solutions supported by thorough research and cutting-edge methods to permanently eradicate your pest infestation.

In the unlikely event that any pests remain present after treatment, we'll return to your home or business to make it right. At the end of the day, we aim to simplify your pest control process in South Carolina, so you can focus on loving life in the Lowcountry.

phone (843) 810-7378

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Latest News in McClellanville, SC

Editorial: A sand mine near this elementary school still makes no sense

Last fall, we urged Charleston County zoning officials not to allow a new sand mine operation on 20 acres next door to the St. James Santee Elementary-Middle School, and our call — along with the voices of several school officials and neighbors — was heard when the county deferred the request. Now that the proposal has returned in a slightly improved but still potentially harmful form, we repeat our request to reject the mining operation and urge others to do the same.We also repeat our call to state regulators to step up ...

Last fall, we urged Charleston County zoning officials not to allow a new sand mine operation on 20 acres next door to the St. James Santee Elementary-Middle School, and our call — along with the voices of several school officials and neighbors — was heard when the county deferred the request. Now that the proposal has returned in a slightly improved but still potentially harmful form, we repeat our request to reject the mining operation and urge others to do the same.

We also repeat our call to state regulators to step up efforts to bring South Carolina’s outdated mining laws up to date. This proposed sand mine is but one of many such operations that have triggered serious concerns about their impact on neighbors’ health and quality of life.

Charleston County’s Board of Zoning Appeals will meet at 4:30 p.m. Monday to consider a special exception for the sand mine off U.S. Highway 17 on a wooded tract just across Lofton Road from the St. James Santee school. While the request has been changed so that sand-laden dump trucks no longer would access U.S. 17 via Lofton, the operation still would create noise, vibration, dust and other problems for the school, which sits less than 1,000 feet away.

About 20 trucks are expected to come and go daily from the mining site, which is also about a half mile from the Francis Marion National Forest.

The county’s own analysis has suggested the mining site could mar land with soil types that the U.S. Department of Agriculture considers the best for agricultural production. The county’s comprehensive plan notes that “Designation of farmland preservation areas recognizes the importance of preserving Charleston County’s farming resources, including individual farms and areas of productive soils, as well as a way of life valued by the community,” and county staff says this mining use may not be consistent with the plan. The staff also notes its proximity to the school may make the mine harmful to the welfare and character of the immediate community.

The Coastal Conservation League’s Riley Egger tells us that while the new access road is a positive concession, “it does not alleviate our concern about the appropriateness of the mine site.” We urge others with similar concerns to email them to [email protected] by noon Friday.

The looming controversy over a sand mine on Lofton Road points to a greater challenge that South Carolina must still grapple with: updating its mining law and regulations to make them appropriate for the 21st century, particularly as once-rural parts of our state are developing or being valued as conserved parks and lands. There are places where new mines are appropriate, but there are also places — such as neighborhoods, schools and public lands — that need to be protected from these new light industrial operations opening up next door. Our state isn’t the same largely rural place it was in the 1970s, when the current regulatory playing field for mining operations was designed.

The state Department of Health and Environmental Control has recently worked with a newly formed Mining Task Force, which includes mining companies and conservationists. We urge all involved to get back to the table and produce recommendations that lawmakers can consider next year. Our coastal communities are seeing how a growing demand for sand and fill leads to dusty highways, unwelcome discharges, blight and a scarred landscape with ponds of limited use. Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties alone have had about 100 active sand mining operations in recent years.

Rejecting the Lofton Road sand mining proposal would be an important step to protect the St. James Santee Elementary and Middle School, but until the state updates its outdated mining law, such zoning controversies will continue to take up more of our time that could better be spent somewhere else.

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Longtime McClellanville restaurant changes hands and will reopen soon

MCCLELLANVILLE — A longtime dining spot in this tiny coastal Charleston County fishing village is under new ownership.A firm called KC3 LLC, owned by Coastal Bus Line businessman Troy Hagemann of Awendaw, bought the 1.5-acre Bent Rod ...

MCCLELLANVILLE — A longtime dining spot in this tiny coastal Charleston County fishing village is under new ownership.

A firm called KC3 LLC, owned by Coastal Bus Line businessman Troy Hagemann of Awendaw, bought the 1.5-acre Bent Rod restaurant site and business at 10024 Highway 17 for $730,000 on April 4, according to Jim Moring of restaurantbrokers.info, who handled the sale for the buyer and seller.

On the same day, Hagemann kept the land but sold the restaurant business to Jami Reavis of Awendaw, owner of Charleston Landscaping, for an undisclosed sum, Moring said.

Reavis plans to reopen the 1,872-square-foot restaurant under the same name, possibly as early as next week, and focus on a barbecue-centric menu. Seafood items still will be available, along with pizza from an outdoor wood-fired oven.

The opening date and hours aren’t quite set as Reavis works to fill out his work crew and get a few last-minute touchups completed, but he plans to be open after 4 p.m. initially before expanding with a lunch menu and daily service.

“I want to be open as much as possible,” he said.

Ahead of the recent business transaction, Reavis was busy putting a fresh coat of paint on the building inside and out, adding some more outdoor tables, expanding the parking area, installing some new TVs inside and in the outdoor tiki bar, putting in a new sound system and creating a game area for cornhole, horse shoes and other outdoor activities.

Charleston is better-positioned in the commercial real estate sector than much larger U.S. markets to stave off economic distress that could result from higher borrowing costs and the unsettled office sector after the pandemic.

That’s the assessment of industry experts who specialize in office, industrial and retail properties.

“There are more tailwinds than headwinds (for Charleston),” said Manus Clancy, senior managing director at Trepp, a New York City-based financial information service for the commercial real estate industry.

Charleston is strong across all property types,” he said. “You are punching above your weight when it comes to the metrics.”

Clancy noted “a dramatic difference in geography” across the nation for areas affected by the fallout of the shift toward the hybrid model of in-person and remote office work policies.

Large cities, such as San Francisco, Baltimore and Seattle, where the quality-of-life quotient is offset by long commutes, are not faring well after the global health crisis.

“This puts cities like Charleston, Greenville, Austin and Salt Lake City in the driver’s seat to attract more industries,” Clancy said.

He pointed out housing costs are higher in Charleston than most of the rest of South Carolina, but compared to many large metro areas it’s more affordable and the quality of life is attractive in the Lowcountry.

He also noted the area’s labor force is strong and increasingly better educated.

“People want to flock to places where their students can be educated,” Clancy said. “In Charleston, you have the ability to make that case.”

Clancy added the financial industry has not fully recovered from the spring scare instigated by several high-profile bank failures, and credit, especially for the office sector, is going to be harder to come by.

Still, he noted borrowing continues in the commercial real estate market, but at roughly half the pace as last year.

Cubicle command

The office market is showing the most stress, with delinquencies of commercial mortgage-backed securities more than doubling from less than 2 percent in December to about 5.5 percent nine months later.

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In the Charleston area, vacancy rates for office space average just under 12 percent, based on composite local market reports for the July-September period from the commercial real estate firms of Avison Young, Colliers and Lee & Associates.

The latter firm said it sees an uptick in office occupancy in 2024 as more employers require staffers to show up in person more often. Avison Young echoed the move next year to the hybrid arrangement.

Colliers cited the updated working environments and ease of access as the drivers of the office market, and the firm projected a flattening of vacancies by the first quarter of next year.

Lee Allen, executive managing director for commercial real estate firm JLL in Charleston, said the local office sector never got overbuilt and the risk is lower for newer, more creative offerings.

“What we have seen in the market is a flight to quality,” Allen said.

Business and other employers that are set on bringing workers back to the office two to three days a week want to elevate their experience with a top-notch working environment to keep top talent from jumping ship.

“Companies are saying, ‘If we are going to ask them to come back, we want to have a place where they want to be,’” Allen said.

He pointed to the 12-story Morrison Yard office development, where JLL is a tenant and handles leasing, as an example, saying it’s 85 percent leased after opening earlier this year.

Real Estate

Up the street on Morrison Drive, the three-story Morris, which opened around mid-year, is about a third occupied and more new prospects are looking at the property, said co-owner Thomas Nakios.

“We are seeing a tremendous amount of activity,” he said. “It’s picked up a lot in the last 60 days. I’m glad we are not in one of the larger markets.”

Nakios noted the Charleston region maintained an equilibrium in office space for the most part because of a drop in demand from tenants before the pandemic shut down much of the in-person economy in early 2020.

Stephen Smith, managing director in South Carolina for commercial real estate firm CBRE, said he’s noticed a slightly more guarded approach for prospective tenants but space is still being leased.

“Everybody wants to be in the nicest, newest space in office markets across South Carolina,” he said.

A day trip to historic McClellanville, SC, is a step back in time

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”Do tell.I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as t...

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.

“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”

Do tell.

I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as the Saturday evening crowd began to gather for dinner and conversation.

T.W. Graham & Co. is a fixture in the small fishing village, and being only a stone’s throw from docks crowded with shrimp boats, it serves up an offering of fresh seafood for lunch and dinner almost daily. With my plate covered with freshly prepared shrimp, hand-shredded cole slaw, fries and hushpuppies, Patrick described how all of this came to be.

“I am from Charleston, and when the owners were looking to sell, I told them our plans and they knew we were the right buyer. They had other offers but did not want it to go to just anyone.”

Originally a general store, T.W. Graham & Co. has served the people of McClellanville in many ways during the 128 years it has sat on Pinckney Street. Today, it continues to be place where villagers and out-of-towners alike gather, and life for the little waterfront community rolls on.

McClellanville lies on the edge of a vast network of marshy creeks and rivers that stretches to the horizon, where the old lighthouse stands on the point of Cape Romain. Founded in the 1850s as a seaside escape for the swamp-haunted plantation owners of the Santee River region, the town quickly became a productive fishing village.

Today, it has become a destination for day tourists and overnight visitors who come to the little settlement between Charleston and Georgetown, with a desire to escape the ordinary and enjoy the peace and quiet of life under the live oaks.

When you visit McClellanville, you will encounter a place that is like a picture of Lowcountry days gone by. A network of quiet streets connect frame houses that range from two-story farmhouse-style to small, comfortable cottages. A dozen classic storefronts stand along Pinckney Street, where you can purchase hand-made local gifts and items of coastal decor, while being welcomed by friendly locals who are glad for your visit.

A crossroads in the center of the village is home to neighborhood churches, including the historic chapel of ease for the parish church of St. James Episcopal. The gingerbread trim reflects the 19th century Lowcountry style. Here, the congregation worships each Sunday, and also maintains the old brick church of St. James Santee near Hampton Plantation.

A drive to the end of Pinckney Street brings you to the Village Museum, a cultural center where the history of the town and region are preserved. A town dock will give you a view down Jeremy Creek to the vast marshy wilderness stretching to the Atlantic, or upstream to the spires and nets of the shrimp fleet, docked at the seafood company off Oak Street.

The boats form a backdrop for the Seaman’s Memorial, dedicated to the memory of those who lost their lives while working the coastal waters of South Carolina. It’s a reminder of the cost of braving sea and storm to bring home each day’s catch.

You can cap off your visit with a delicious meal at T.W. Graham & Co. or at one of the other great restaurants in town, local institutions like the McClellanville Diner, The Bent Rod, and Buckshots provide an array of seafood, comfort food or more adventurous fare to please any palate.

As I finished my meal and prepared to return home, I only wished that I had more time to explore and enjoy this quiet, beautiful town. Whether you stay in McClellanville for a day, or simply visit while passing through, you will feel very much at home.

McClellanville is located off US. 17 between Charleston and Georgetown.

A drive of a little over two hours will take you through Charleston and along the wide, lonely coast highway. McClellanville is located 30 miles above Charleston and just before you cross the Santee River. As you come within the town limits you will see three of the popular local restaurants, each open at various days and times to accommodate your appetite or itinerary.

To enter the village proper, take a right onto Pinckney Street, and follow its winding track into town. You will soon come to the business district where shops and T.W. Graham & Co. welcome you, or you can continue beyond to visit the museum, churches and the often-busy waterfront along Jeremy Creek.

There are many things to do and explore nearby as well. You can explore nature at Santee Coastal Reserve, discover history at Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, or arrange for an excursion by boat to visit the historic lighthouse at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.

For more information on the town and its offerings, visit the town of McClellanville homepage at https://www.mcclellanvillesc.org or call T.W. Graham & Co. at (843) 887-4342.

A veteran says he has a service dog. McClellanville says he has a vicious one.

Is Gus a good boy?To his 79-year-old Marine veteran owner, the 130-pound German shepherd is a calming force who helps him keep his balance and live a life that feels closer to normal. To his neighbors in McClellanville, the dog is a good reason to avoid Baker Street. More than once, he has charged toward people out on walks with their dogs to attack. One man and his pet required stitches after. Another said she cracked a rib falling after Gus latched on to her small dog.Doug Holsclaw said receiving the notice in April that Gus ...

Is Gus a good boy?

To his 79-year-old Marine veteran owner, the 130-pound German shepherd is a calming force who helps him keep his balance and live a life that feels closer to normal. To his neighbors in McClellanville, the dog is a good reason to avoid Baker Street. More than once, he has charged toward people out on walks with their dogs to attack. One man and his pet required stitches after. Another said she cracked a rib falling after Gus latched on to her small dog.

Doug Holsclaw said receiving the notice in April that Gus was banned from living in town hit him almost as hard as losing his brother 42 years ago. He is suing to bring Gus home.

The case will largely boil down to which description of Holsclaw’s 5-year-old companion sticks.

Gus is a service dog. Gus is a vicious dog. He can’t be both.

McClellanville, a small fishing town of about 600 people about 40 miles north of Charleston, allows dogs to roam freely. Rutledge Leland, who has been mayor for more than 40 years, said the town’s dog laws come up in meetings nearly every year.

The town has long considered a leash law, holding referendums on the matter over the years, Leland said. But most residents remain opposed.

“We tend to be a community, we wanted people to have dogs, but obviously we don’t want them to interfere with people’s day-to-day activities,” he said.

Rutledge declined to talk about Gus because of the pending lawsuit, but said his behavior has been an ongoing problem.

“It’s just a bad situation,” he said. “We’ll try to be fair.”

After a resident asked the town to reconsider a leash law in May 2021, Cecil Mills told Town Council about his encounter with Gus as he was walking on Baker Street. Mills pursued charges. Holsclaw paid restitution and the case was ultimately dropped. Mills said he doesn’t doubt Holsclaw’s claim that he needs a service dog. But he doesn’t believe Gus qualifies, and he still doesn’t allow his grandchildren to walk in that direction because he’s afraid of what might happen if Holsclaw’s other dog got loose.

CCSD considering magnet program for future high school in McClellanville area

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.Since the closure of Lincoln High School, kids are waking up earlier t...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Plans are finally in motion to replace the old Lincoln High School with a brand new school in McClellanville.

It's been nearly a decade since Lincoln High closed. At a board meeting Wednesday night, there was finally talk of what a new school would bring the community.

Charleston County School District leaders presented a slideshow detailing the future of the new high school and middle school in northern Charleston County.

Since the closure of Lincoln High School, kids are waking up earlier to make the bell at Wando High and returning home late because of the long drive.

The constituent school board said a new school will bring relief to the people living in Awendaw and it will provide help to the schools already reaching capacity.

The district is looking at attendance lines within the area while looking at creating a magnet program.

"I do believe a partial magnet or magnet program of some kind might be within the programming options and given that it's going to have a size of 1,000 students it will probably need to pull in some areas other than just the McClellanville and Awendaw area," said Pamela Jouan-Goldman, Chair of the District 2 Constituent School Board.

Scenarios of possible zoning were shown during the meeting.

The methodology was based off the fiscal year 2022 data.

Parents voiced their concerns of drawing the line further down into Mount Pleasant.

"You do not want to force a family who is living right next door to a school go up the road to another school if at all possible so that's why were looking at the magnet as an opportunity to attract families that want to go there despite any increase in distance then they would have," Chief Operating Officer of CCSD Jeff Borowy said.

The district's goal is to get 500 students in both the middle and high school.

Thomas Colleton, Chair of the District 1 Constituent Board, said the school will need to offer something enticing.

“It is important to this build the school but at the same time let's figure out what were going to be doing inside. The curriculum means a lot," Colleton said.

“I don't know how much it would make sense to drive by Wando High School to get on (Highway) 17 to go up to Awendaw, but it does sound like they are going to have different specific programs at their school. So for example if they have got a great art program and my daughter is really into art, that sounds like a nice option to have," said Jonathan Mars, a parent of students at Carolina Park.

Colleton said it's crucial everyone is transparent throughout this process.

Their next steps will be to develop a blue-ribbon committee to review these options and create a draft to be presented to the constituent boards in October.

"I'm hopeful this blue ribbon commission will ease some of this tension, and let people know going to another school, which would be a state of the art school, why wouldn't you want your child to go there," Colleton said.

The Kaiser Farm Tract property was leased in December of 2021 to the former owner to be used as a hay farm.

The three-year lease agreement is able to be terminated at any time with a 90-day notice.

It's also possible a park and library could be built on the property in the future.

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