Why should I hire a pest control specialist? I can just kill the bugs myself.

Pest Control in Sullivans Island, SC

Imagine this: You're sitting in your living room enjoying a nice evening with your family when your sweet tooth strikes, and you get up to go to the kitchen. You just purchased a brand-new pint of your favorite ice cream, and it's ready and waiting for you to dig in. You take it out of the freezer, open the lid, and look down at the cold, creamy treat in front of you. But before you splurge, you need a spoon to help. You can't be getting ice cream all over your fingers, after all.

You walk a couple of steps to the drawer, grab a spoon, and turn around with your mouth watering. Only now, it looks like something has beat you to the first bite. It's a giant cockroach, and it's sitting right on top of the fresh pint of ice cream you opened less than a minute ago. You can see its small, hairy legs digging into your delectable dessert - legs that have undoubtedly crawled over much worse things than the ice cream you bought.

Now, your ice cream is ruined, and you've got that creepy-crawly feeling that other roaches and bugs are living just under the surface of every counter and floorboard of your house. Unfortunately, that scenario could be very true - and depending on the pest, your family could be at risk.

For most Lowcountry residents, home is a sanctuary of comfort and privacy. It's a place where they can relax and spend quality time with their loved ones after a tiring day at work. However, pests like roaches and rodents are not mindful of boundaries and can invade your personal space at any moment. That fresh pint of ice cream you left on the counter? That's their meal for the evening.

They seek refuge and sustenance inside your dwelling, which is an appalling thought for most homeowners. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be your reality when you have pest control in Sullivans Island, SC from Low Country Pest Management.

Service Areas

A Critter-Free Home Starts with Low Country Pest Management

At Low Country Pest Management, we know how crucial it is for your home or business to be clean and pest-free. That's why we approach every pest control project with highly-trained technicians, effective control methods, and eco-friendly solutions.

In fact, we make it a point to provide all our customers with top-quality workmanship, reliability, and exceptional customer service, no matter how complex or simple the job may be. When you call Low Country Pest Management about a pest control problem, you can rest assured that it will be addressed safely, efficiently, and professionally.

Unlike some pest control companies in South Carolina, our expert technicians use the most advanced state-of-the-art tools and control strategies, complemented by decades of combined pest control experience. We specialize in many types of pest control and address a wide range of pests, including:

To truly serve our customers with effective pest control services, our tactics go beyond basic pest treatments by inspecting your home and making recommendations for pest-proofing your structure. By using targeted, eco-friendly pest control tactics based on Integrated Pest Management, we can prevent pests from entering your home in the first place. That way, you and your family can sleep well at night, knowing you don't have to worry about an infestation.

At Low Country Management, we address many types of pests, from termite control in Sullivans Island, SC, to rodent control and even crawlspace encapsulations for pests.

Lowcountry Pest Management Sullivans Island, SC
  • Rodents Rodents
  • Roaches Termites
  • Roaches Roaches
  • Crickets Crickets
  • Ants Ants
  • Centipedes Centipedes
  • Fleas Fleas
  • Earwigs Earwigs
  • Silverfish Silverfish
  • Spiders Spiders
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What Clients Say About Us

What are the Biggest Benefits of

Pest Control in Sullivans Island, SC?

At Low Country Pest Management, one of the most common questions we hear online is, "Why should I hire a pest control specialist? I can just kill the bugs myself." While this is true to a certain extent, truly effective pest control requires professional tools, strategies, and experience. Stomping a spider on your living room floor isn't going to control or prevent them from coming back.

Here are just a few reasons why homeowners and business owners should consider hiring a pest control company to remedy their problems.

Reduced Chance of Illness and Health Issues

Reduced Chance of Illness and Health Issues

Working with a pest control company like Low Country Pest Management can reduce and even eliminate many common health concerns relating to pests. Because the truth is many pests can transfer harmful bacteria and diseases via their droppings, bites, and more, causing allergic reactions and worse.

Professional Knowledge and Expertise

Professional Knowledge and Expertise

When it comes to pest control, it's best to leave it to the professionals. They have the knowledge and training to handle pests efficiently and effectively. With access to the latest tools and technology, you can trust that they will take care of any pest infestations in a safe and thorough manner. At Low Country Pest Management, we cater our pest control methods to your needs and your home or business for the most effective results. Contact our office today to learn more about our effective approach to pest control in Sullivans Island, SC.

Less Stress

Less Stress

When you're aware that you have a pest issue, it can be hard not to over-stress and overthink the situation. If you're losing sleep due to a fear of bed bugs, spiders, or other pests, professional pest control can help you stress less. Once your infestation is over, you can finally breathe again. To keep your stress levels low, our technicians don't just eliminate pests from your living space – they tell you how they did it and explain the steps you can take to avoid pests in the future.

Cost-Conscious Pest Control Solutions

Cost-Conscious Pest Control Solutions

Choosing a professional pest control service is a more budget-friendly option than attempting DIY methods. DIY solutions are often less effective and may not completely eradicate the issue. Professional pest control companies possess the necessary skills and equipment to ensure the task is accomplished correctly, ultimately saving you money in the future. Furthermore, they can complete the job quickly, removing pests promptly so that you can quickly resume your normal routine.

Avoid Costly Damage to Your Home

Avoid Costly Damage to Your Home

If not taken care of, pests can cause severe harm to your property. They can spoil food, ruin furniture and fixtures, and even harm the structural stability of your home or business. To avoid such damage and save money, you should consider hiring a professional pest control service.

At Low Country Pest Management, we provide peace of mind for our customers through our reliable, effective pest control services in South Carolina. Some of the most requested services we offer include rodent control, termite control, and crawlspace encapsulations.

 Just Kill The Bugs Sullivans Island, SC

At Low Country Pest Management, we provide peace of mind for our customers through our reliable, effective pest control services in South Carolina. Some of the most requested services we offer include rodent control, termite control, and crawlspace encapsulations.

phone (843) 810-7378

Is There a Rat Hiding in Your Home?

It's Time for Rodent Control in Sullivans Island, SC

Discovering a rat, mouse, squirrel, or other rodent in your home can be a distressing experience. These nasty creatures are known for their destructive behavior, chewing on wires, spreading bacteria, and leaving behind dangerous droppings.

Rodents are also known to breed and multiply quickly. While it may be tempting to take matters into your own hands and swat them away with a broom, seeking professional rodent control services is the safest and most effective way to protect your loved ones. Our skilled rodent control technicians are licensed and have the necessary expertise and equipment to provide long-term solutions for your family's safety.

Our effective rodent control strategies include sealing as many holes and cracks as possible on the outside of your home. Large holes or cracks in your foundation are filled with steel wool or wire mesh before sealing with caulk or foam to keep mice from chewing through. Our pest control techs then seal any openings into your attic space to prevent mice and other unwanted guests out.

Some of the most common rodents we keep out of your home include the following:

  • Rats
  • Mice
  • Opossums
  • Squirrels
  • Raccoons
  • More

Low Country Pest Management Pro Tip:

Great rodent control doesn't end when our technicians leave. To keep rodents as far away from your home as possible, remember to keep materials, such as firewood or stacks of lumber, away from the house to minimize hiding places. Debris and leaves should be removed from around the foundation of your home. Lastly, try to keep the inside of your home clean, tidy, and free of food items lying around.

Pest Control Sullivans Island, SC

Protect Your Home and Belongings with

Termite Control in Sullivans Island, SC

Termites can cause significant damage to your home's aesthetics and structural integrity, surpassing that of hurricanes and fires combined. With a single colony consisting of thousands or millions of members, termites have an endless supply of their favorite food: wood. As they relentlessly consume wood and other materials, extensive subterranean and dry wood damage can occur.

Unfortunately, in South Carolina, without professional termite control, it's not a matter of if termites will find your home but when. To make matters worse, most homeowner insurance policies do not cover termite damage, meaning it's imperative that you deal with termite infestations quickly and efficiently. If you suspect a termite infestation in your home, reach out to Low Country Pest Management ASAP for an inspection.

Our termite solutions include a bi-annual inspection (coming out to your house twice a year) instead of the standard one time per year, protecting your home from termites in South Carolina, including the destructive subterranean termite. Most other termite exterminators in South Carolina don't provide such comprehensive service.

 Rodent Control Sullivans Island, SC
 Ite Control Sullivans Island, SC

What Factors Contribute to Termites in Your Home?

In the Lowcountry and other areas of South Carolina, termites infest homes every day for various reasons. Different types of termites are attracted to wood, but each species has a specific preference for the type of wood they consume. Dampwood termites prefer damp wood, while drywood termites look for dry wood. On the other hand, subterranean termites require moist soil nearby and will devour any wood in contact with or close to the earth.

The following factors may lead to a termite infestation in your home:

  • Year-Round Humidity
  • Warm or Hot Weather
  • Moisture Due to Leaky Pipes, Bad Airflow, or Poor Drainage
  • Wood in Contact with Your Home, Like Mulch and Shrubs
  • Gaps in Your Home's Siding
  • Cracks or Fissures in the Foundation of Your Home

Tips for a Termite-Free Home

While professional termite control is always the best route to go for effective, long-term termite prevention, there are some steps you can take to help mitigate termites in your home.

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drainage

Correct Drainage Issues

To keep termites at bay, it's important to avoid excess moisture around your home. Termites thrive in damp conditions, so proper drainage around your house can help prevent an infestation. Check that your downspouts are directing water away from your home, and ensure that your A/C drip lines and faucets aren't causing water to pool around your foundation. Additionally, be sure to clean your gutters regularly to prevent any excess moisture buildup.

Move Mulch

Move Mulch

Most mulches are made of wood and are also damp or wet, creating the perfect environment for termites to thrive. Make sure you rake any mulch you have away from the foundation of your home to minimize termite infestations.

Keep Firewood Away

Keep Firewood Away

Much like mulch, firewood and other forms of wood like discarded branches can give termites easy access to your home when they're too close. Try to move firewood away from the foundation of your home much like you move mulch. For more tips on how you can mitigate a termite infestation in your home, contact Low Country Pest Management.

Crawlspace Pest Encapsulations:

Prevention from the Ground Up

To maintain an active infestation, household pests require three basic requirements: a food source, a harborage area for survival and reproduction, and moisture. Moisture problems within a property often lead to pest issues, making it necessary to include crawl space insect control in your home maintenance plan. Low Country Pest Management recognizes that eliminating excess moisture is crucial to safeguarding a property and its occupants from pests throughout the year.

That's why we often install crawlspace encapsulation for issues like rodent and termite control in Sullivans Island, SC.

 Pest Encapsulation Sullivans Island, SC
Lowcountry Pest Management Sullivans Island, SC

What is Crawlspace Encapsulation for Pest Control?

Encapsulation for pests is a tactic that includes covering the walls of your crawlspace with a heavy-duty vapor barrier material to help minimize moisture and, by proxy, keep pests at bay. This barrier is secured to your foundation's walls and ceiling piers. To further benefit an encapsulation for pest control, our team may use dehumidifiers, foundation fans, or foundation vents to further decrease moisture.

Signs You Need a Crawlspace Pest Encapsulation

Excessive moisture in and around a house can lead to the proliferation of household pests like rodents, spiders, house ants, carpenter ants, centipedes, earwigs, and crickets. If you notice any of the following signs, it may be time to consider crawl space insect control.

  • Smells of Must or Mold
  • Mildew on Your Floors or Ceilings
  • Soil in Crawlspace is Wet
  • Bricks or Masonry Around Home is Crumbling
  • Standing or Pooling Water Within or Near Foundation
  • Discoloration on Your Home’s Siding
  • Porch and Patio Water Stains
  • Spongy-Feeling Flooring

To learn more about pest encapsulation services from Low Country Pest Management, contact our office today. We would be happy to explain our process and hear more about the issues you're facing.

 Just Kill The Bugs Sullivans Island, SC

Trust the Best When

It's Time to Eliminate Pests

Whether you need rodent control in Sullivans Island, SC, or you're dealing with another form of pests such as termites, roaches, spiders, and more, Low Country Pest Management is here to help. Unlike some of our competition, our #1 goal is to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind. Our team of skilled pest control professionals implements environmentally-friendly solutions supported by thorough research and cutting-edge methods to permanently eradicate your pest infestation.

In the unlikely event that any pests remain present after treatment, we'll return to your home or business to make it right. At the end of the day, we aim to simplify your pest control process in South Carolina, so you can focus on loving life in the Lowcountry.

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Latest News in Sullivans Island, SC

Letters: Private club is wrong for Sullivan's Island neighborhood

I have lived on Sullivan’s Island since 1997.In a recent article about an exclusive club being proposed for the island, developer Shep Davis said, “The property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to Island residents.”This is not true.When SCE&G owned the ...

I have lived on Sullivan’s Island since 1997.

In a recent article about an exclusive club being proposed for the island, developer Shep Davis said, “The property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to Island residents.”

This is not true.

When SCE&G owned the Sand Dunes Club, island residents were allowed to buy passes to use the swimming pool for a very nominal fee.

The Sullivan’s Island Park Foundation held its annual fundraiser at the club. Innumerable residents used it for weddings, graduation parties, family reunions as well as bat and bar mitzvah parties.

The developers are requesting that Town Council change the zoning ordinances to allow for commercial use in a residential neighborhood.

This is a very slippery slope and a path Town Council must not take.

Single-family residential zoning has always been sacred on Sullivan’s Island, and separation between commercial and residential neighborhoods has always been maintained.

This is one of the things that makes our island special.

If an exclusive private club in the middle of a residential neighborhood is allowed on Sullivan’s Island, it could tear an irreparable hole in the fabric of our community.

PAT VOTAVA

Sullivan’s Island

Thanks for the recent, important editorial urging the S.C. Department of Transportation to improve safety conditions on King Street for people with wheels and pedestrians.

Speaking as a downtown resident without a car or bike, however, I am also concerned about the hazards of walking on Charleston’s many broken sidewalks.

I recently was dismayed to watch a young man in a wheelchair struggle to get past the broken sidewalk at 41 George St. near the College of Charleston. (I offered a push, but he declined and likely was embarrassed).

My husband fell a short time ago while trying to walk on the protruding and missing red bricks outside the college.

There are broken sidewalk pieces, and some sidewalks end in the middle of the block.

Is there any reason to allow safety cones to decorate a hole in the sidewalk for months at the corner of Meeting Street and Wragg Square?

Three months ago, I sent a list with photos of broken or unfinished sidewalks to the city authorities.

Two sites were fixed immediately on Calhoun Street in front of Gaillard Center (this was during Spoleto season), but most of the rest remain hazardous.

SHARON FRATEPIETRO

Charleston

Solomon Stevens’ commentary of July 30 said we have to resist the temptation to try to make our schools an extension of the moral or religious orientation of our homes. He wrote schools were never intended to be that and should not be that.

Yale University was founded as a Christian educational institution. In the book, “Sex and God at Yale,” author Nathan Harden chronicles the efforts of a secular president to replace that religious orientation with one based on raw secularism.

Among other things, he brought to the campus a lecturer who produced pornographic movies and claimed to have had sex with scores of women.

Things got so out of hand, the president was fired.

My point is that if Christians are not militant — in a nonviolent way — about what is being taught in schools, people who despise them and their beliefs will rush in to fill that vacuum.

When Thomas Jefferson wrote for “separation of church and state,” he did not write for separation of Christianity and state.

Mr. Stevens wrote our children need to learn how to think critically. That includes weighing and balancing competing arguments.

I agree. They need to balance 400 years of Christian teaching in this country with what has taken place in the non-Christian countries of the world.

Would we be better off today if our forefathers had embraced their religions and philosophies? Of course not.

I believe all public schools should teach the fundamental concepts of Christianity in order to provide the students with a basic understanding of the premise behind the many movements that have sharped our country.

Whether it was abolition, labor, civil rights or other movements, Christian principles have played a profound role.

Only after students understand this can they make intelligent judgments about competing arguments and how to confront complexities of the world around them.

GARY H. KNIGHT

Holly Hill

To submit a letter to the editor, send an email to [email protected] or fill out the form on our online portal.

Letters can be a maximum of 250 words and are subject to editing for clarity, tone and libel. They must carry the writer’s name and address for publication and a daytime telephone number for verification.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Sullivan's Island group urges protection of Maritime Forest

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island For All wants to make sure people know not only the beauty of the Maritime Forest, but also how it protects the community.Karen Byko, the president of Sullivan's Island For All, says the forest is more than just a home for wildlife.Read more: ...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island For All wants to make sure people know not only the beauty of the Maritime Forest, but also how it protects the community.

Karen Byko, the president of Sullivan's Island For All, says the forest is more than just a home for wildlife.

Read more: Lowcountry law enforcement helps those in need at Seacoast Church

"The trees here are protecting us, so we need to protect them," she said. "The Maritime Forest provides a vegetative wall between the ocean and the homeowners, so that as storm surge comes in from the ocean, they provide that wall to protect us from that water. It's critically important that we preserve these trees to protect the island from that kind of destructive erosion."

Byko says there are some threats to this forest, such as the illegal cutting of the trees.

"We have people frequently who come out here and cut into public land trust, trees, and vegetation they do not own and they don't have a right to do," she said. "This land is protected for all of us to be able to enjoy."

According to Byko, everyone should care about this issue. She advocates for the protection of these 195 acres.

"We live in a world where we know the effects of climate change are accelerating," Byko said. "We know these types of habitats are increasingly being destroyed and eroded. I just encourage everybody to come out here and know why we are fighting so hard to try to save this."

Byko also mentioned this forest is one of the last of its kind.

"There are very few places we can go to anymore that we can be in a wild space like this and be able to just enjoy it," Byko said. "If you look at maritime forests, you'll find there are very few that are left along the entire East Coast of the United States. This is one of the last few remaining Maritime Forests in the United States that's easily accessible to anybody."

"Anybody in Charleston can get in their car, drive over here, find a parking space, and enjoy the Maritime Forest," she said.

Sullivan's Island saved 100 Palmetto trees from being axed. They are again at risk.

Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island could look sparse in the new year. Sixteen miles of streets and roadways on the barrier island are part of Dominion Energy's routine tree-trimming project at the start of 2024.Dominion Energy has contracted with Xylem Tree Experts to trim limbs that are within unsafe proximity to power lines, beginning Jan. 2. Work will begin near Fort Moultrie, and crews will make their way toward Breach Inlet over an eight- to 10-week period.The 16-mile collection of streets and roads on Sullivan&rsquo...

Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island could look sparse in the new year. Sixteen miles of streets and roadways on the barrier island are part of Dominion Energy's routine tree-trimming project at the start of 2024.

Dominion Energy has contracted with Xylem Tree Experts to trim limbs that are within unsafe proximity to power lines, beginning Jan. 2. Work will begin near Fort Moultrie, and crews will make their way toward Breach Inlet over an eight- to 10-week period.

The 16-mile collection of streets and roads on Sullivan’s Island is part of a larger trimming effort that spans 87 miles and includes portions of Mount Pleasant, Isle of Palms and Goat Island.

Each time a trimming project is announced, feedback and concern from residents is expected — particularly when the removal of palmetto trees is a possibility.

Sullivan’s Island is no stranger to this: the power utility had plans to remove over 200 palmetto trees on the island in 2020, but paused the effort following a meeting with the town’s mayor, Patrick O’Neil.

“We certainly understand the passion surrounding trees in the Lowcountry; we work and live here, too," said Dominion Energy spokesman Paul Fischer. "These are our communities, as well, and we understand that, but safeguarding overhead electric lines is critical to keeping the lights on for all the customers we serve.”

About 100 palmetto trees were not cut down as a result of that meeting and continued to grow, O'Neil said. This time around, Sullivan's Island may not get so lucky.

"We got a stay of execution for about 100 or so of them that were not definitely intruding on the required space that power lines have around them," O'Neil said. "I'm assuming a large number of them will have to go this time, unfortunately. But you know, we've made it clear to them that we hope they won't do anything more than is absolutely necessary."

Fischer said there are currently no palmetto trees specifically targeted for removal, but the trees that pose a risk to overhead lines soon will be identified. Trees needing removal will be marked with spray paint at the base, Mark Branham, Dominion Energy forester, said during a presentation to Sullivan’s Island Town Council on Dec. 19.

Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse a Last of its Kind: Beacon of the Beach

Every nightfall, a rotating light pulsates around Sullivan’s Island twice every 30 seconds. The luminous source is the Charleston Light, also referred to as the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse, which has stood watch over the cozy beach town for more than six decades.When the pillar of light was first lit on June 15, 1962, it was recorded as the last major lighthouse in the United States built by the federal government. It was also the second brightest lighthouse in the Western Hemisphere, according to Fort Moultrie National H...

Every nightfall, a rotating light pulsates around Sullivan’s Island twice every 30 seconds. The luminous source is the Charleston Light, also referred to as the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse, which has stood watch over the cozy beach town for more than six decades.

When the pillar of light was first lit on June 15, 1962, it was recorded as the last major lighthouse in the United States built by the federal government. It was also the second brightest lighthouse in the Western Hemisphere, according to Fort Moultrie National Historical Park guide Shelby McAllister.

The Charleston Light was erected to replace the defunct Morris Island Light, which was rebuilt in the 1870s after being destroyed in the Civil War. The lighthouse was at risk of being destroyed again by erosion and was later decommissioned.

Standing at 162.5 feet tall, approaching vessels in the Charleston Harbor could see the flash of the Charleston Light’s 28-million candlepower beam from more than 50 miles offshore. Five years after its construction, its wattage was reduced to 1.2-million candlepower, but it is still visible more than 25 miles away.

Its bright light wasn’t the only thing that caught people’s eyes. Many residents felt the original red and white color scheme was an eyesore. As the sun bleached the red to orange, it was decided that a paint job was in order. Black and white was the popular choice, so the Charleston Light received a makeover.

Sixty-one years later, the mid-century monolithic structure serves as more of a nautical landmark than a navigational aid, but its maritime history is not lost at sea. It was a fixture of the U.S. Coast Guard Historic District that includes buildings dating back to 1894.

When the Coast Guard automated the lighthouse in 1975, it no longer needed a keeper. In 2008, the Coast Guard relinquished ownership to the National Park Service.

THE MAN BEHIND THE LIGHT

Architect Jack Graham’s creation was not only the last of its kind, but it was also one of a kind. His vision for the lighthouse lit up in his mind when he was a 25-year-old graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Architecture and a serviceman in the Coast Guard.

In Graham’s last month of active duty, a supervisor gave him a final assignment of designing a lighthouse. The Coast Guard was displeased with the previous drawings that made it resemble a World War I battleship signal tower. By the time Graham was finished, it looked like an air traffic control tower.

Unlike typical circular lighthouses, Graham’s design was triangular with steel girders for the framework and aluminum alloy for siding. He credited his modernist approach and design to his college professor Louis Kahn, an influential modern architect in the post-World War II era known for his monumental and brutalist style.

In September 1989, Graham’s work would be put to the test when Hurricane Hugo lashed the island as a Category 5. The lighthouse’s design was intended to withstand winds up to 125 miles per hour. Hugo brought winds of 160 miles per hour, and the lighthouse never faltered.

In 2009, on Graham’s 75th birthday, he was able to view his creation from the top as he rode in the elevator for the first time. He wasn’t aware that his design was used for the lighthouse until three years after it was built, when he was flipping through a boating magazine.

The lighthouse became eligible to be listed on the National Register as part of the structures in the Coast Guard Historic District in 2012. That same year marked the structure’s 50th anniversary, during which Graham was recognized for the first time with an official ceremony and a historical marker on site.

Before Graham’s passing in June 2022, his wife Martha, who lives in Maryland, wrote “The Charleston Light and The Adventures of Scoops the Seagull.” The children’s book is about the lighthouse, which her beloved husband nicknamed “Sulli.”

Graham’s story lives on in the annals of history and is rekindled every time the sun sinks down past the horizon on Sullivan’s Island. That’s when the lighthouse and Graham’s legacy truly come to life.

Today, the lighthouse stands as one of the most technologically advanced for its time. It is the only lighthouse in America that has both an elevator and air conditioning, according to McAllister.

Due to ongoing problems with the elevator, there are no plans to open the lighthouse to the public. Of the 15 historic lighthouses in the state, none are currently open to the public due mainly to structural issues, she noted.

“This is history that is slowly disappearing, but not many people realize that,” McAllister added.

The National Park Service celebrates National Lighthouse Day every August by opening the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse grounds to the public. The last time the lighthouse was open for tours was 2018.

By Zach Giroux

Sullivan’s Island Fire Department Renovates Facility: Fire Station Facelift Charleston & Mount Pleasant, SC Retirement Living Options at Franke at Seaside Southern String Supply: Master of Their Craft

Where to Eat Well at Charleston’s Beaches

Many of those visiting Charleston know that downtown is a hot spot for restaurants, but where should folks visiting one of the local beaches eat? From barbecue to noodle bowls, these island eateries can offer a wealth of choices for the hungry wave jumper or sunbather. Read MoreEater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. ...

Many of those visiting Charleston know that downtown is a hot spot for restaurants, but where should folks visiting one of the local beaches eat? From barbecue to noodle bowls, these island eateries can offer a wealth of choices for the hungry wave jumper or sunbather.

Read More

Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process. If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Before a day at Folly Beach, frequent visitors know to hit up Lost Dog for brunch. The cafe has something for everyone on the menu, from huevos rancheros to fresh fruit parfaits. Relax with a mimosa before hitting the waves and sand.

Full of surfers and deal-seekers, Folly Beach stop Jack of Cups offers filling curry nachos, dahl, and curry meatballs. The menu is a mash-up of different cuisines from across the globe, including nods to the South, which is always good while sipping a few craft beers.

Self-proclaimed “chill ass bar,” Lowlife offers expertly crafted cocktails, queso, local shrimp rolls, double cheeseburgers, and more in a hip and lively beach space. Lowlife also serves brunch every day of the week, so it’s like a vacation within a vacation.

A visit to Taco Boy is all about the experience. The interiors are lively and full of fun details. It offers a long list of tacos with unexpected fillings, like the Korean beef tacos stuffed with kimchi and grilled flank steak or the sauteed shrimp tacos come with ancho chile yogurt sauce and cabbage. On a nice day, enjoy the patio with a few friends and a frozen screwdriver to go with the other selections.

Spanish for "the ugly boy," Chico Feo makes for a super chill stop after a day on the beach. The eatery feels like visiting a friend’s backyard. The menu is a mix-up of warm weather favorites from across the globe, like Cuban beans and rice, bun cha, and plenty of tacos.

Bert’s Market isn’t a restaurant, but it is an icon on Folly Beach. The 24-hour corner store is well known as stop for made-to-order sandwiches and just about everything else you need for a day at the beach. Bert’s puts it best: “Patronized by freaks, surfers, skaters, crunks, retirees, tourists, stoners, day trippers, hippies, hipsters, and regular folk, Bert’s is the rockingest grocery in town.”

Dining at Sullivan’s Fish Camp is like stepping onto a sailboat out of the 1970s. The retro-chic restaurant is one of the chicest on the island. The menu includes fish camp classics, like peel-and-eat shrimp and smoked fish dip, paired with more modern offerings, like a tuna smash burger or Nashville hot grouper cheeks.

Diners can eat pizza, pasta, and fresh seafood just a few steps from the ocean. From the skilled hands of executive chef Jacques Larson, the Obstinate Daughter offers a stunning dining room to spend visit for lunch, brunch, or dinner. Visitors should order a craft cocktail, a few oysters, and try the ricotta gnocchi with short rib ragu at least once.

Home Team BBQ on Sullivan's Island is always packed with friends and families ordering pulled pork plates and catching a game on the televisions. The smoked wings with Alabama white sauce are addictive, as are the frozen boozy Gamechanger cocktails.

Cozy bistro High Thyme offers a more upscale experience than most beach-goers expect. Guests visit this Middle Street restaurant for celebratory dinners and Sunday morning brunches. Find dishes like mussels in a coconut chili broth, cioppino, three-meat bolognese lasagna, lamb meatballs, and more comforting dishes.

Contemporary Italian eatery Coda del Pesce sits right on the beach at Isle of Palms. Customers can watch the ocean while ordering from chef Ken Vedrinski’s seafood-filled menu. Make reservations early for dishes like the snowy grouper with peanut potatoes, grapes, and Castelvetrano olives.

Before a day at Folly Beach, frequent visitors know to hit up Lost Dog for brunch. The cafe has something for everyone on the menu, from huevos rancheros to fresh fruit parfaits. Relax with a mimosa before hitting the waves and sand.

Full of surfers and deal-seekers, Folly Beach stop Jack of Cups offers filling curry nachos, dahl, and curry meatballs. The menu is a mash-up of different cuisines from across the globe, including nods to the South, which is always good while sipping a few craft beers.

Self-proclaimed “chill ass bar,” Lowlife offers expertly crafted cocktails, queso, local shrimp rolls, double cheeseburgers, and more in a hip and lively beach space. Lowlife also serves brunch every day of the week, so it’s like a vacation within a vacation.

A visit to Taco Boy is all about the experience. The interiors are lively and full of fun details. It offers a long list of tacos with unexpected fillings, like the Korean beef tacos stuffed with kimchi and grilled flank steak or the sauteed shrimp tacos come with ancho chile yogurt sauce and cabbage. On a nice day, enjoy the patio with a few friends and a frozen screwdriver to go with the other selections.

Spanish for "the ugly boy," Chico Feo makes for a super chill stop after a day on the beach. The eatery feels like visiting a friend’s backyard. The menu is a mix-up of warm weather favorites from across the globe, like Cuban beans and rice, bun cha, and plenty of tacos.

Bert’s Market isn’t a restaurant, but it is an icon on Folly Beach. The 24-hour corner store is well known as stop for made-to-order sandwiches and just about everything else you need for a day at the beach. Bert’s puts it best: “Patronized by freaks, surfers, skaters, crunks, retirees, tourists, stoners, day trippers, hippies, hipsters, and regular folk, Bert’s is the rockingest grocery in town.”

Dining at Sullivan’s Fish Camp is like stepping onto a sailboat out of the 1970s. The retro-chic restaurant is one of the chicest on the island. The menu includes fish camp classics, like peel-and-eat shrimp and smoked fish dip, paired with more modern offerings, like a tuna smash burger or Nashville hot grouper cheeks.

Diners can eat pizza, pasta, and fresh seafood just a few steps from the ocean. From the skilled hands of executive chef Jacques Larson, the Obstinate Daughter offers a stunning dining room to spend visit for lunch, brunch, or dinner. Visitors should order a craft cocktail, a few oysters, and try the ricotta gnocchi with short rib ragu at least once.

Home Team BBQ on Sullivan's Island is always packed with friends and families ordering pulled pork plates and catching a game on the televisions. The smoked wings with Alabama white sauce are addictive, as are the frozen boozy Gamechanger cocktails.

Cozy bistro High Thyme offers a more upscale experience than most beach-goers expect. Guests visit this Middle Street restaurant for celebratory dinners and Sunday morning brunches. Find dishes like mussels in a coconut chili broth, cioppino, three-meat bolognese lasagna, lamb meatballs, and more comforting dishes.

Contemporary Italian eatery Coda del Pesce sits right on the beach at Isle of Palms. Customers can watch the ocean while ordering from chef Ken Vedrinski’s seafood-filled menu. Make reservations early for dishes like the snowy grouper with peanut potatoes, grapes, and Castelvetrano olives.

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